China is using batch testing to test 9 million people in a week

Uncategorized
A car enters a temporary drive-through Covid-19 testing site at East Orange District Park in Orlando, Florida, on October 1.
A car enters a temporary drive-through Covid-19 testing site at East Orange District Park in Orlando, Florida, on October 1. Paul Hennessy/NurPhoto/Getty Images

As predicted, the United States is now grappling with a new Covid-19 surge — one that could overwhelm hospitals, kill thousands of Americans a day by January and leave even young survivors with long-term complications.

“We went down to the lowest point lately in early September, around 30,000-35,000 new cases a day. Now we’re back up to (about) 50,000 new cases a day. And it’s going to continue to rise,” Dr. Peter Hotez, dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine, said Tuesday.

“This is the fall/winter surge that everyone was worried about. And now it’s happening. And it’s happening especially in the northern Midwest, and the Northern states are getting hit very hard — Wisconsin, Montana, the Dakotas. But it’s going to be nationally soon enough.”

Across the country, more than 30 states have reported more Covid-19 cases this past week than they reported the previous week, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

And Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, sounded an alarm about certain states’ test-positivity rates, saying they may be a good indicator that steeper climbs in case rates are ahead.

For the whole country, test positivity averaged 5.1% over the past week as of Tuesday. But in at least 13 states, the figure was above 10%: in Alabama, Florida, Iowa, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, South Dakota, Utah, Wisconsin and Wyoming, according to the COVID Tracking Project.

“You’d like to see (the rates) less than 3%, optimally 1% or less,” Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said at an event hosted by the College of American Pathologists.
“We’re starting to see a number of states well above that, which is often — in fact, invariably — highly predictive of a resurgence of cases, which historically we know leads to an increase in hospitalizations and then ultimately an increase in deaths,” he said.

Read the full story:

Amid rising Covid-19 cases and hospitalizations, local US leaders and public health experts worry of a coming surge

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *